Tuesday, August 14, 2018

MAE WEST: ABOVE THE REST, by Susan King

In honor of Mae West's 125th birthday, the Egyptian Theatre will screen her bawdy classic She Done Him Wrong on Saturday, August 18, with an introduction by author Michael Gregg Michaud.

Did you know that Mae West released a holiday album in 1966 called Wild Christmas? Among the songs were - of course - an especially suggestive version of “Santa Baby,” and such innuendo-filled tunes as “Santa Come Up and See Me” and “Put the Loot in the Boot, Santa.”


Award-winning former L.A. Times film critic Kevin Thomas was all of 30 when he was assigned to interview West about the Christmas disc at her famed white and gold apartment at Hollywood's Ravenwood apartment building. It was the beginning of a beautiful friendship that lasted until her death in 1980 at age 87.

Thursday, July 26, 2018

THE MAGIC OF MILOS, by Judith Resell

“He had a magical way with actors,” Courtney Love recalls of Milos Forman, her director in The People Vs. Larry Flynt. “I didn’t have a lot of experience. I would miss my marks, step on Woody’s lines. But Milos went out of his way to cast people who were the character.” Love’s incredible performance as Larry Flynt’s wife Althea is ample proof of Forman’s casting judgment.

Courtney Love appeared following a screening of the film at the Aero Theater on June 30, 2018, along with the screenwriting team of Larry Karazewski and Scott Alexander. The program was one in a series of events paying tribute to Milos Forman.

Photo by Mario Jennings

Wednesday, July 18, 2018

THE WOMEN BEHIND THE CAMERA IN EARLY FILMMAKING, by Cari Beauchamp

In honor of the series "Pioneers: First Women Filmmakers" running July 27-29 at the Egyptian, author and historian Cari Beauchamp provides some background on these innovators and their peers.

Alice Guy-Blaché was not only the first woman director, she was one of the very first film directors, period. She was a secretary to camera maker Leon Gaumont, and together they attended the first-ever public screening of a movie in Paris in 1895, "Workers Leaving the Lumiere Factory." As a result, Gaumont agreed to let Alice "play" with their cameras as long as her clerical duties didn't suffer. Her after-hours creations became among the first narrative films and they were so successful, she was made the head of Gaumont’s newly formed production company in 1897. Over the next decade, she directed over 1000 short films and when she moved to America in 1910 with her husband, the cameraman Herbert Blache, she formed Solax in Fort Lee, New Jersey, where she directed and supervised several hundred more films over the next four years. Despite having two children to look after, Guy-Blaché kept pace with the production schedule of D.W. Griffith, who was directing his films for Biograph in nearby lower Manhattan.


Alice Guy-Blaché. Courtesy of Cari Beauchamp
New York and New Jersey were the hub of activity in the early years of the motion picture industry. Few took filmmaking seriously as a business, and so the doors were wide open to women who were unwelcome in other professions. Movies were an idea one week, filming the next, and in the theaters within a month. There were no paths to follow and no rules to break.

Tuesday, July 10, 2018

HUMPHREY BOGART: TIMELESS, by Susan King

Humphrey Bogart’s final film The Harder They Fall was released in May 1956. And Bogart died eight months later at the age of 57.


But his charisma and brilliance has defied the ages.

Tuesday, June 5, 2018

SUE CAMERON'S HOLLYWOOD SECRETS AND SCANDALS, by Susan King

Do you like to go “camping” at the movies?

Then head over to the Egyptian Theatre on June 14th for a double bill camp fest-1967’s Valley of the Dolls, the wonderfully bad adaptation of Jacqueline Susann’s sexy, best-selling novel starring Sharon Tate, Patty Duke, and Barbara Parkins, followed by 1971’s What’s the Matter with Helen?, a delicious horror thriller penned by What Ever Happened to Baby Jane? novelist Henry Farrell and starring Debbie Reynolds and Shelley Winters.

It’s definitely a two-popcorn evening.



Introducing the films is veteran journalist Sue Cameron, who has a potboiler of a new book called  Hollywood Secrets and Scandals: The Truth Behind Stars’ Closed Doors. Come early and catch Cameron signing copies of the book in the Egyptian Theatre lobby starting at 6:30 p.m.

Wednesday, May 23, 2018

DOUG DARROW ON BEHALF OF DOLBY LABORATORIES TO RECEIVE THE 2018 SID GRAUMAN AWARD PRESENTED BY HILL VALLEY

The American Cinematheque Sounds Off with the Choice of Dolby Laboratories
The American Cinematheque sounds off with the choice of sound giant Dolby Laboratories for the 2018 Sid Grauman Award recipient. Doug Darrow, on behalf of Dolby Laboratories, will receive the 2018 Sid Grauman Award Presented by Hill Valley. Dolby Laboratories will be honored for its achievements in the motion picture industry at the top of the American Cinematheque’s annual benefit award show where, this year, the non-profit organization will present its 32nd annual career achievement award, known as the American Cinematheque GRoW @ Annenberg Title and Educational Sponsor for the American Cinematheque, to four-time Academy Award nominee Bradley Cooper. The presentation of both the Sid Grauman and American Cinematheque awards will take place Thursday, November 29, 2018 at The Beverly Hilton.



American Cinematheque Chairman Rick Nicita said, “The American Cinematheque is pleased to present this year’s annual Sid Grauman award to Dolby Laboratories for its outstanding contributions to theatrical exhibition. Dolby has revolutionized the moviegoing experience with its breakthrough innovations, including Dolby Cinema, Dolby Vision HDR, and Dolby Atmos immersive audio, using the full spectrum of storytelling capabilities to transform the way movies are made and presented. The Dolby brand has become the gold standard that assures audiences worldwide that they are hearing, seeing, and experiencing a movie in a way that truly delivers on the creative intent.”